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Chicory - Foods & Nutrition

Chicory

(Cichorium intybus) Traditionally used as an additive to coffee, or as a substitute for coffee. It's a natural sedative and anti-inflammatory that treats jaundice, helps the body resist gallstones and liver stones, and aids in reducing the levels of LDL cholesterol in the blood. This herb is particularly useful to rid the body of parasites, which are held mostly at bay by modern medicine. The flowers, used as a poultice, help with wound healing. Hardy Biennial in zones 3-10.
ref. - http://www.heirloomsolutions.com/herbs/chicory.html



ref: 120703 - http://www.offthegridnews.com/2012/06/25/mother-natures-first-aid-kit-10-backyard-plants-for-first-aid-and-general-wellness/

Chicory

Chicory is a roadside herb with sky blue flowers that open in the morning and close by early afternoon. While one might think it is native to the U.S., it was actually imported by colonists. Though the leaves were used in the 1770’s and Thomas Jefferson stated that it made “a tolerable sallad[sic] for the table”, the root was (and still is) most commonly used as a coffee additive and substitute.

But chicory’s uses reach far beyond salad and a hot drink (that aids in digestion due to inulin content): when the roots are made into a decoction, they can be used as a general health tonic, a laxative, and a diuretic. The bruised leaves can be used externally as a dressing for swellings.

Avoid excessive internal use if you have gallstones.


































ref. - http://www.heirloomsolutions.com/herbs/chicory.html