STAR TREK
THE NEXT GENERATION
TECHNICAL MANUAL

[Table of Contents]



14.0 AUXILIARY SPACECRAFT SYSTEMS

14.1 Shuttlecraft Operations
14.1
SHUTTLECRAFT OPERATIONS



The USS Enterprise is equipped with auxiliary shuttlecraft to support mission objectives.

Standard complement of shuttlecraft includes ten standard personnel shuttles, ten cargo shuttles, and five special-purpose craft. Additional special-purpose shuttles can be provided to a starship as necessary. The Enterprise also carries twelve two-person shuttlepods for extravehicular and short-range use.

Operating rules require that at least eleven shuttle vehicles be maintained at operational status at all times. Cruise Mode operating rules require one standard shuttlecraft and one shuttlepod to be at urgent standby at all times, available for launch at five minutes' notice. Four additional shuttlecraft are always available on immediate standby (thirty minutes to launch), and an additional six vehicles are maintained for launch with twelve hours' notice. Red Alert Mode operating rules require two additional shuttles to be brought to urgent standby, and all nine remaining operational vehicles to be maintained at immediate standby.


14.2 Shuttlebays

14.2
SHUTTLEBAYS



The Galaxy class USS Enterprise has three major facilities intended for the support of auxiliary shuttlecraft operations from the ship.

MAIN SHUTTLEBAY
Located in the center and aft sections of Deck 4 in the Primary Hull, the Main Shuttlebay includes launch support, recovery, and maintenance facilities for shuttle operations.


Two additional secondary shuttlebays are located in the center and aft sections (both port and starboard) of Deck 13 in the dorsal area of the Secondary Hull.


Shuttlebay exterior space doors are triple-layered compressible extruded duranium. Inner doors are composed of lightweight neofoam sheeting in an expanded tritanium framework. During active shuttlebay operations, atmospheric integrity is maintained by means of an annular forcefield, which permits both doors to remain open for vehicular ingress and egress without depressurizing the bay.

SHUTTLEBAY TWO also includes a dedicated maintenance bay for servicing sensor array pallets. Two shuttlepods are provided for extravehicular removal and replacement of these pallets. Additionally, two adjacent maintenance bays provide work facilities for preparation and servicing of mission-specific sensor instrumentation.

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SHUTTLEBAY THREE includes hardware for short-term conversion to Class H, K, or L environmental conditions, intended for use in emergency evacuation situations.
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Each shuttlebay has its own operations control booth, which is supervised by an on-duty Flight Deck Officer. Each Flight Deck Officer is responsible for operations within that particular shuttlebay, but must report to the main shuttlebay officer for launch and landing clearance. In turn, the main shuttlebay officer must seek clearance from the Operations Manager on the Main Bridge.

Launch maneuvers and landing approach piloting is managed by a number of precision short-range tractor beam emitters located in each shuttlebay and on the ship's exterior, just outside each set of space doors. These tractor beams are computer controlled under the direction of the Flight Deck Officer, permitting the safe maneuvering of shuttle vehicles within the bays and in the 350-meter approach zone.


Maintenance facilities include replacement parts sufficient for twelve months of normal starship operations. These normally include two complete replacement spaceframes, which can be used for refurbishment of severely damaged ships.

Note that replicator usage can allow fabrication of nearly any critical missing parts, but large-scale replication is not considered energy-efficient except in emergency situations. However, in such situations, power usage is usually strictly limited, so it is unwise to depend upon the availability of replicated space parts. This is another reason that the ship must maintain a significant stock of spare parts in inventory at all times.
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We did not have a shuttlecraft for much of our first season. The reason is that the expense of building all of the standing Enterprise sets was so high that the studio wanted to defer the expense of the shuttle until the second season. What the studio didn't count on is that writer Sandy Fries wanted to show some parts of the ship that hadn't been shown yet. Upon discovering that we had not yet seen a shuttlecraft, Sandy was quick to write it into his first season script "Coming of Age." Ironically, this was somewhat similar to the situation that existed during the early days of the original Star Trek series when they, too, could not yet afford a shuttlecraft mockup. (This also explains why our heroes did not send a shuttle down to the planet to rescue Sulu and company in the original series' early first season episode "The Enemy Within.")
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14.3 Shuttlecraft

14.3
SHUTTLECRAFT



The three shuttle vehicles most often carried in the USS Enterprise inventory are represented in the views and specifications below. See also the "Shuttlepods and EVA" category above. Single major uprated variants are included. As combinations of interchangeable components, such as cargo pallets, engines, and unique mission housings, will affect vehicle dimensions and performance figures, only base values are given.
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We don't have a list of the names of all shuttlecraft and shuttlepods onboard the Enterprise. The main reason is that this is one of those things you want to leave somewhat nebulous so that writers of future episodes have some room to play around with. Names established to date include: Sakharov (named after the late Soviet physicist and peace advocate), El Baz (for planetary geologist Farouk El Baz), Onizuka (for the Challenger astronaut), Pike (for Christopher Pike, early captain of the first starship Enterprise), Feynman (for the Nobel laureate physicist who was Mike's hero), Hawking (for physicist Stephen Hawking), and Voltaire (for the eighteenth- century French writer and philosopher). We've also seen a shuttlepod Cousteau, from the starship Aries. Most of these names were selected or approved by Rick Berman. We made a big status graphic in the shuttlebay control booth in which an unreadable display suggests that we might have shuttles with names like Sam Freedle (our unit production manager during the second season), Indiana Jones (after the noted archaeologist), and a few others we probably shouldn't mention. During the filming of the episode "In Theory," directed by Star Trek actor Patrick Stewart (who occasionally works as a spokesperson for Pontiac automobiles), some wag on the production crew relabeled the shuttlepod with the name Pontiac-1701D.
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Shuttlepod Type 15 PRODUCTION BASE: Starbase 134 Integration Facility, Rigel VI. TYPE: Light short-range sublight shuttle.

ACCOMMODATION: Two; pilot and systems manager. POWER PLANT: Two 500 millicochrane impulse driver engines, eight DeFl 657 hot gas RCS thrusters. Three sarium krellide storage cells. DIMENSIONS: Length, 3.6 m; beam, 2.4 m; height, 1.6 m.

MASS: 0.86 metric tonnes.

PERFORMANCE: Maximum delta-v, 12,800 m/sec. ARMAMENT: Two Type IV phaser emitters.
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Shuttlepod Type 15A

PRODUCTION BASE: Starbase 134 Integration Facility, Rigel VI. TYPE: Light short-range sublight shuttle.

ACCOMMODATION: Two; pilot and systems manager.

POWER PLANT: Two 500 millicochrane impulse driver engines, eight DeFl 657 ... hot gas RCS thrusters. Three sarium krellide storage cells.

DIMENSIONS: Length, 3.6 m; beam, 2.4 m; height, 1.6 m. MASS: 0.97 metric tonnes.

PERFORMANCE: Maximum delta-v, 13,200 m/sec. ARMAMENT: Two Type IV phaser emitters.
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Shuttlepod Type 16

PRODUCTION BASE: Starbase 134 Integration Facility, Rigel VI. TYPE: Medium short-range sublight shuttle. ACCOMMODATION: Two; pilot and systems manager. POWER PLANT: Two 750 millicochrane impulse driver engines, eight DeFl 635 ...hot gas RCS thrusters. Four sarium krellide storage cells.

DIMENSIONS: Length, 4.8 m; beam, 2.4 m; height, 1.6 m. MASS: 1.25 metric tonnes.

PERFORMANCE: Maximum delta-v, 12,250 m/sec.

ARMAMENT: Two Type IV phaser emitters.
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Personnel Shuttle Type 6

PRODUCTION BASE: ASDB Integration Facility, Utopia Planitia Fleet Yards, Mars. TYPE: Light short-range warp shuttle.

ACCOMMODATION: Two flight crew. Passenger configurations: six (STD); two (diplomatic). POWER PLANT: Two 1,250 millicochrane warp engines, twelve DeFl 3234 microfusion RCS thrusters (STD); two 2,100 millicochrane warp engines (UPRTD).

DIMENSIONS: Length, 6.0 m; beam, 4.4 m; height, 2.7 m.

MASS: 3.38 metric tonnes. PERFORMANCE: Warp 1.2 for 48 hours (STD); Warp 2 for 36 hours ...(UPRTD). ARMAMENT: None (STD); Two Type IV phaser emitters (special operations).
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Personnel Shuttle Type 7 PRODUCTION BASE: ASDB Integration Facility, Utopia Planitia Fleet Yards, Mars.

TYPE: Medium short-range warp shuttle.

ACCOMMODATION: Two flight crew. Passenger configurations: six (STD); two (diplomatic). POWER PLANT: Two 1,250 millicochrane warp engines, twelve DeFl 3234 microfusion RCS thrusters (STD); two 2,100 millicochrane warp engines (UPRTD).

DIMENSIONS: Length, 8.5 m; beam, 3.6 m; height, 2.7 m.

MASS: 3.96 metric tonnes.

PERFORMANCE: Warp 1.75 for 48 hours (STD); Warp 2 for 36 hours (UPRTD). ARMAMENT: None (STD); two Type V phaser emitters (special operations). ..........................................
Cargo Shuttle Type 9A

PRODUCTION BASE: Starfleet Plant #24, Utopia Planitia Fleet Yards, Mars. TYPE: Heavy long-range warp shuttle.

ACCOMMODATION: Two flight crew, one cargo specialist.

POWER PLANT: Two 2,150 millicochrane warp engines, twelve DeFl 2142 microfusion RCS thrusters (STD); two 2,175 millicochrane warp engines (UPRTD).

DIMENSIONS: Length, 10.5 m; beam, 4.2 m; height, 3.6 m. MASS: 4.5 metric tonnes (empty). Maximum payload, 6.6 metric tonnes (STD); 8.9 metric tonnes (UPRTD). PERFORMANCE: Warp 2 for 36 hours (STD); Warp 2.2 for 32 hours (UPRTD). ARMAMENT: None (standard); two Type V phaser emitters (special operations).
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Sphinx Workpod Type M1 (Base Module/Sled Attachments)

PRODUCTION BASE: Starfleet Plant #2, Utopia Planitia Fleet Yards, Mars.

TYPE: Light industrial manipulator (Sphinx M1A), medium industrial manipulator (Sphinx M2A), and medium tug (Sphinx MT3D). ACCOMMODATION: Pilot (M1A, M2A); pilot and cargo specialist (MT3D).

POWER PLANT: Two 4,600 Newton-second IĄ microfusion primary thrusters, sixteen DeBe 3453 hot gas RCS thrusters. Four alfinium krellide power storage cells. DIMENSIONS: Length, 6.2 m; beam, 2.6 m; height, 2.5 m. MASS: 1.2 metric tonnes. PERFORMANCE: Maximum delta-v, 2,000 m/sec. Maximum manipulator mass, 2.3 metric tonnes. Maximum sled mass, 4.5 metric tonnes. ARMAMENT: None.
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14.4 Extravehicular Activity

14.4
EXTRAVEHICULAR ACTIVITY (EVA)
Situations requiring one or more crew members to exit the starship in an airless or otherwise hostile environment are known collectively as extravehicular activity (EVA). These include detailed visual inspections, periodic maintenance, damage control, and unique hardware modifications. They may be done alone or in concert with teleoperator and automated systems.

Various degrees of protection are available for starship crews. While the actual configurations carried by Starfleet vessels will vary according to major mission segments and swapouts for improved models, typical suit types are presented here. The first, the low pressure environment garment (LPEG), is a close-fitting, lightweight suit, designed for benign airless operations. One use would be during an orbital starbase layover, where the spacecraft is in External Support Mode, well protected against radiation and micrometeoroid hazards. The suit features simplified multilayer construction, affording atmospheric integrity, gas exchange, and thermal and humidity control without sacrificing mobility. All consumables and circulation equipment are mounted within an integral backpack, with controls placed for 50 percentile humanoids on the chest and forearm areas. The suit allows for exterior operations, though time outside is limited to three hours. A variant of the LPEG is the emergency pressure garment (EPG), designed for long-term storage in starship emergency equipment lockers. The EPG is capable of supporting life for two hours in most ship abandonment or isolated hull breach scenarios while crews await rescue.


Starfleet's midlevel suit is the standard extravehicular work garment (SEWG). This type is reinforced with additional radiation and pressure layers for extended operations, and is configured with a sixteen-hour consumables supply, plus enhanced recycling devices. It is designed for most major industrial tasks and hazardous exploration assignments. Radiation and micrometeoroid protection is essentially unlimited. The suit controls are supplemented by advanced autonomic life support controllers within the suit computer.


The current high-level suit is the augmented personnel module (APM). This suit is a hybrid garment composed of both hard and flexible body segments, essentially a complete small spacecraft. The concept, still valid after four hundred years, allows the occupant to perform slightly longer duration missions than the SEWG, but with much greater relative comfort. A wide array of readily available tools and manipulator options is coupled with reaction control system thrusters, resulting in high productivity EVA returns.

All suit types are available in customized versions for nonhumanoid and handicapped crew members.
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14.5 (Not listed in Book)

14.6 Captain's Yacht
14.6
CAPTAIN'S YACHT



One of the specialized auxiliary spacecraft carried by the USS Enterprise is the captain's yacht. This spacecraft is characterized as multipurpose, though it normally functions to convey diplomatic personnel on special missions not normally accomplished by shipboard transporters.


The general planform is a flattened elliptical solid, designed for the space environment and extended atmospheric flight. It measures 10 m along the minor axis and 18 m in the major axis, and 8 m in height. The total loaded mass is rated at 95 metric tonnes. The structural framing comprises gamma- welded tritanium and duranium members measuring an average 18.6 x 9.2 cm in cross section. Hull skinning is composed of eight alternating layers of keiyurium borocarbide and cortenium molybdenite, with major tiling sections averaging 6.02 cm thick.


The interior habitat volume is subvdivided to form the flight deck, two modest staterooms, flight crew bunks, galley, and Engineering access. Surrounding the habitat are the imbedded impulse engine system, cryogenic reactant tanks, lenticular aerodyne atmosphere flight motors, and related subsystems. The spacecraft is normally piloted by a crew of two, supplemented by a service representative to assist diplomatic guests.


The yacht is capable of sustained sublight velocities approaching 0.65c. The impulse propulsion system (IPS) consists of six sequential beam- fusion reaction chambers feeding a central toroidal driver coil. Each chamber measures 1.3 m in diameter and is similar to its larger IPS cousins on the Enterprise. The reaction exhaust is vented through the driver coil and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator for impulse travel. The MHD tap provides power to the navigational deflector grid for removal of interstellar dust and gas from the vehicle flight path. For atmosphere flight the exhaust is redirected after it exits the MHD tunnel and sent through the aerodyne engines around the ellipse equator. The normal atmosphere cruising velocity is Mach 6; maximum safe waverider velocity is Mach 20. Magnetic turbulence contour equalizers, variants of the navigational deflector, provide momentum conditioning at Mach transitions.


The Enterprise is designed to operate safely without the yacht in place, since its structural integrity field and inertial damping fields produce slightly modified fields in those areas to compensate for the concavity of the yacht docking structure. Yacht operational rules in the vicinity of the starship are generally the same as those for other auxillary spacecraft, with the difference being that the yacht, during emergency undockings, may be safely deployed at velocities as high as Warp Factor 7. The yacht's systems are designed to afford the craft a smooth falloff of warp field, though the decaying field energy cannot be sustained for any appreciable time.
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This is one of those nifty things that we may never get to see on the show. We did briefly flirt with the idea of actually using the captain's yacht in "Samaritan Snare," but it was decided to use an "executive shuttlecraft" instead. Patrick Stewart informs us that the yacht is named Calypso, after Jacques Cousteau's ship. Visual effects coordinator (and Navy veteran) Ron B. Moore points out that naval tradition would probably insist the craft be called the Captain's Gig.
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